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The links across the banner should provide you with enough information about the Club to inspire you to come for a ride. Below is more information about the Club including some frequently asked questions.

Club rides are recognised as being very well organised with leaders, rear riders, and a corner marking system. The members are very experienced. We do not ride in formation. The emphasis is on fun. We avoid highways as we consider them boring and risky; we look for interesting roads and destinations. We are not about food or drinking; we don't ride pub to pub. That is not to say we are not social - we have regular social sips, an on-line club magazine, private social media pages, weekends away, and regular BBQs at member homes - it is just that riding is our priority.

Most of us are professionals riding big bore Japanese or other exotica who can afford the habit, and the majority are "older" more experienced riders. There is a hard core of regulars who ride most Sundays - notably the Committee - and the members get out as often as their other commitments allow.

Some frequently asked questions are:

  • How far do you ride?

  • We ride between 300 and 500 km every Sunday, typically at the higher end of the scale. We also have the occasional short ride. See itinerary page.

  • What should I wear?

  • Safety is an important feature of our rides. Given the distances we travel and the time of year you should be appropriately dressed - helmet, jacket, pants, boots, gloves. (Gloves, even on hot days. No gloves (or boots), no ride.) Our strong preference is for full leathers or the equivalent synthetic protective clothing. Of course, if it is raining, you will need wet weather protection as well.

  • What should I bring?

  • To participate in a ride just turn up at the designated starting point with a full tank of fuel, appropriate protective clothing, a licence and a roadworthy and reliable bike. Normally we start at a service station, so the fuel side of things is looked after.

    Experienced riders find themselves carrying articles to improve the quality of their ride. Such items as ear plugs, sun glasses, sun screen and a water bottle help look after the body.

    From a bike maintenance perspective, a can of chain lube and the standard toolkit may prove useful. A can of Mr Sheen and a couple of rags facilitate bug removal from your visor.

    The more community minded individuals carry odd things like cable ties and duct tape which may assist at an incident. In the same vein, a St John's First Aid Kit is carried by regular riders.

    Throw in your wallet, mobile phone, digital camera and pen and paper and it becomes useful to fit a pillion seat bag to carry this small pile of extras.

  • Are my tyres good enough?

  • Good tyres are critical to safety and reliability. Hence we request that all riders have good rubber fitted front and rear when participating in Club rides. Slick shod bikes will be turned away due to the unwanted attention they attract, even if the dubious argument can be made that they are safer than regular tyres.

    The concept of "just one more ride" out of a tyre, though understandable from an economic point of view, fails dismally from a reliability and safety perspective. Chances are you will get a puncture, or suffer a worse fate. Grip is directly proportional to tread depth. No tread depth, no grip. It is as simple as that.

  • Do I need to pay anything on the ride?

  • There are no charges associated with the rides.

  • Do I need to phone the leader to let them know I am attending?
    No, just turn up at the designated starting point. Please make yourself known to the other riders, especially the leader.

  • How fast do you ride?
    Riders can travel at their own pace; if they wish to travel faster, they will end up corner marking more often. If they ride at a leisurely rate then only occasionally will they be required to corner-mark. Effectively, riders can travel at any speed they wish.
  • Do I need to know where I am going?

  • No, the advantage of the corner marking system is that riders very rarely get lost. There is no need to be constantly looking at a map - in fact you don't even have to know where you are going! Using a corner marking system makes for a smooth, flowing ride.

  • Have I got the right sort of bike?

  • The size of the bike is not normally an issue. The bike should have sufficient power to maintain the legal speed limit in all conditions. Most bikes above 250cc are adequate. The bike must be registered and roadworthy. Understanding the limitations of your bike is critical, for instance, cruiser style bikes generally have reduced ground clearance in corners. Not exceeding the manufacturers design envelope is critical to safe riding.

  • Will I hold up the rear rider? Will I be able to keep up?

  • The rear rider will not pass anyone. But, we ask that riders have the technical ability to be able to maintain the legal limit everywhere - including uphill, into a head wind, and on twisty roads. Otherwise it is impossible to plan rides with any degree of certainty with respect to distances and times. Inability to maintain the legal speed limit is more to do with skill, experience and rider attitude rather than limitations of the bike.

    Less experienced riders may feel pressured to ride faster, and hence we recommend that learners not ride with us, particularly due to the distances we ride.

    Rider safety is of paramount importance to the Club. Riders should not feel pressured to ride above their skill level. So, at any time, a rider can leave the ride, letting the rear rider know first. Fatigue can be an issue for less experienced riders.

  • How do I join?

  • Prospective members must have attended at least three rides in the previous 12 months before applying for membership. Full membership costs $60, Associate membership $30. Associate membership applies to non-riders such as pillions or partners who can enjoy Social Sips, BBQs and weekends away.

  • Where do you go?

  • We have rides in all directions from Melbourne in about a 200km radius. Yes, we do have rides that head out west, usually starting at the Laverton service station on Geelong Road.

  • What is special about the MSR?

  • A thorough read of the web site will give you an indication of where we sit in the market. In a nut shell we are very organised, very professional and have very experienced riders riding well maintained machines. More importantly, our riders are true enthusiasts who love nothing better than to go for a Sunday ride in the company of other enthusiasts and share a safe and fun riding experience. Again and again.

  • What are the intangible benefits of joining the MSR?

  • The Club provides a wealth of experience in most (road oriented) facets of motorcycling. Some people just live and breathe tyres and suspension. One of the benefits of riding with our Club is that you will be able to tap into this valuable resource. If you would like to understand motorcycle suspension a little better, click here.

  • How will I know if I will like riding with you guys?

  • The only way to work out if we are right for you is to come for a ride. There is no obligation, just arrive with a full tank of petrol. At any time you are free to return home.

    Tips for your First Ride with MSR - a short article by a Club member

    You are welcome to come along to any of our rides. We hope to see you soon.



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    This page is maintained by Ben Warden. For more information please email [email protected]

    Last modified: 6 January, 2017